Posted by: ionlife | June 4, 2008

NEW FILTERS!!!!! IonLife has Specialty Water Ionizer Filters for their Jupiter Ionizers! Descriptions are BELOW!!!!

Specialty filters to help you get cleaner water! IonLife is carrying the best filters available for your health!!

Arsenic,Lead & Fluoride! Chloramines! Heavy Metals! Hydrogen Sulfide! Nitrates! Sediments! Green Carbon!

RO’s! Whole Home Systems! Softeners! Re-mineralizers! etc!!

These aren’t even posted on the site yet. There are compatible with any of the Jupiter/IonLife Water Ionizers or the LIFE water Ionizers!

CALL to get more details!!! 775.851.0748, 775.851.0683 OR 800.875.9025!!!! Yay!! Free DVD, Free Ionizer Shipping, 5 Yr. Ionizer Warranty. etc.. . . . IonLife is making waves!!! yeahhooo!!!

http://www.ionizers.org

ARSENIC, LEAD & FLUORIDE

Arsenic

Arsenic is a metallic element that forms a number of poisonous compounds, and is found in nature at low levels – mostly in compounds with oxygen, chlorine, and sulfur, defining inorganic arsenic compounds. Arsenic in plants and animals combines with carbon and hydrogen to create organic arsenic. Organic arsenic is usually less harmful than inorganic arsenic and when it enters the environment, it does not evaporate. Usually it gets into air when contaminated materials are burned, settles from the air to the ground where it does not break down, but often changes from one form to another. Most arsenic compounds are water soluble.

How is it used?

Arsenic compounds are mainly used to preserve wood. They are also used to make insecticides and weed killers. Copper and lead ores also contain small amounts of arsenic.

What are the health effects?

Inorganic arsenic is a human poison. Organic arsenic is less harmful but still not preferable. High levels of inorganic arsenic in food or water can be fatal and a high level is 60 parts of arsenic per million parts of food or water (60 ppm). Arsenic damages many tissues including nerve, stomach, intestines, and skin. Breathing high levels can give you a sore throat and irritated lungs and long term exposure to inorganic arsenic may lead to a darkening of the skin and the appearance of small warts on the palms, soles, and torso. Additional extended exposure to arsenic via drinking-water can cause cancer of the skin, lungs, urinary bladder, and kidney, as well as other skin changes such as pigmentation changes and thickening.

Is there any harm from drinking and bathing in contaminated water?

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sets limits on the amount of arsenic that industrial sources can release. EPA has set a limit of 0.05 parts per million (ppm) for arsenic in drinking water. The US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) established a maximum permissible exposure limit for workplace airborne arsenic of 10 micrograms per cubic meter. Any amount is far from preferable.

Lead

Lead is a naturally occurring bluish-gray metal found in small amounts on the earth’s outer layer. Lead can be found in all parts of our environment and a majority comes from human activities including burning fossil fuels, mining, and manufacturing.

Lead is found in many different materials, including but not limited to batteries, ammunition, metal products such as solder and pipes, and devices to shield X-rays. Because of health concerns, the amount of lead found in gasoline, paints and ceramic products, caulking, and pipe solder have been reduced in recent years. Lead rarely occurs naturally in water; it usually gets into the water from the delivery system: service connections, pipes, solder, and brass fixtures. Reactions between the water and these parts can cause corrosion and cause the lead to get into your water. It is estimated that lead in drinking water contributes between 10%-20% of total lead exposure in young children. Food is the greatest single source of lead exposure for the average adult.

How is it used?

The largest use for lead is in storage batteries in cars and other motor vehicles. Lead may be used as a pure metal, alloyed with other metals, or as a chemical compound. Most lead today is obtained from recovery of recycled scrap and those batteries.

Human activities, such as lead mining and smelting operations and manufacturing and use of lead products (e.g., leaded gasoline, lead-based paint), have resulted in the contamination of many industrial and residential areas with lead.

Additionally cosmetics contain lead notable amounts.

What are the health effects?

Short term effects: Lead can cause a variety of adverse health effects when people are exposed to it for relatively short periods of time. These effects may include interference with red blood cell chemistry, delays in normal physical and mental development in babies and young children, slight deficits in the attention span, hearing, and learning abilities of children, and slight increases in the blood pressure of some adults.

Long-term effects: Lead has the potential to cause the following effects from a lifetime exposure of stroke and kidney disease; cancer. Lead may also cause irreversible neurological damage as well as renal disease, cardiovascular effects, and reproductive toxicity.

Is there any harm from drinking and bathing in contaminated water?

Lead and lead compounds can be highly toxic when eaten or inhaled. Although lead is absorbed very slowly into the body, its rate of excretion is even slower. Thus, with constant exposure, lead accumulates gradually in the body. It is absorbed by the red blood cells and circulated through the body where it becomes concentrated in soft tissues, especially the liver and kidneys. Lead can cause lesions in the central nervous system and apparently can damage the cells making up the blood-brain barrier that protects the brain from many harmful chemicals.

If contaminant levels are found to be consistently above an Action Level set by the EPA, your water supplier must take steps to reduce the amount of lead so that it is consistently below that level. If the levels of lead exceed the Action Level, the system must notify the public via newspapers, radio, TV and other means. Customers will be informed of what they can do at home to lower their exposure to lead. Additional actions, such as providing alternative drinking water supplies, may be required to prevent serious risks to public health.

Fluoride

Fluoride is the ion of the element fluorine. Although it occurs in small amounts in plants and animals, and has effects on the formation of dental enamel and bones, it is not considered to be a dietary essential and no deficiency signs are known.
Naturally, the fluoride content of water ranges between 0.05 and 14
ppm. Water containing more than about 12 ppm fluoride can lead to chalky white patches on the surface of the teeth, known as mottled enamel. At higher levels there is strong brown mottling of the teeth and inappropriate deposition of fluoride in bones known as fluorosis.

How is it used?

Fluorides are important industrial chemicals with a number of uses but the largest uses are for aluminum production, drinking water fluoridation and the manufacture of fluoridated dental preparations.

The concept of fluoridation (adding fluoride to foods and water) has been with us for decades. Some clever scientists noticed that organic fluorine is required with calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Extrapolating this, the scientists decided that more fluorine may mean more healthy teeth, (although they couldn’t prove this) and suggested that water supplies be “enhanced” with ionic fluoride, which is not the same compound and has different health effects. Coincidentally, the scientists worked for large paper and aluminium manufacturers, whose industrial processes produce large amounts of fluoride! Ionic fluoride does not contribute to this process and instead causes the over stimulation of the parathyroid glands, resulting in abnormal bone growth, calcification of tendons and ligaments and interrupts the process which generates energy in cells. Wide variations in fluoride intake among children make estimating fluoride intake difficult and much controversy surrounding fluoridation and youth.

Is there any harm from drinking and bathing in contaminated water?

Yes!!! On August 9, 2007 Fluoride Action Network signed by over 600 professionals calling for an end to fluoridation and a call to legislators in fluoridating countries to hold hearings to determine why, after the release of the landmark National Research Council report 2006, aggressive promotion of fluoridation continues. Now there are over 1,720 signers!

Signers included;

• 247 PhD’s (includes DSc, Doctor of Science)
• 226 Dentists (DDS, DMD, BDS)
• 219 MD’s (includes MBBS)
• 208 DC’s (Doctor of Chiropractic)
• 203 Nurses (RN, BSN, ARNP, APRN, LNC)
• 96 ND’s (Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine)
• 47 Lawyers (JD and LLB)
• 32 RDHs (Registered Dental Hygienist and RDHAP)
• 29 Acupuncturists (LAc – Licensed Acupuncturist, and, MAc -Master Acupuncturist)
• 28 Pharmacists (Pharm.D, B. Pharm, DPh, RPH)
• 18 DO’s (Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine)

“According to Dr. William Hirzy, a chemist at American University and vice president of EPA’s Professionals Union in Washington D.C., “the difference between the levels of fluoride causing toxic effects and the levels added to water to prevent tooth decay is vanishingly small and deeply troubling.”

Fluoride is found in processed food, beverages, dental products, pesticide residues and polluted air. “The end result is that some people drinking water with just 1 ppm fluoride may ingest enough fluoride from all sources to experience a health problem,” says Hirzy

“Since [the 1940s], the percent of individuals consuming fluoridated water (in the US) has steadily increased. The increase in percentage of communities with fluoridated water has resulted in an increase in the mean content of fluoride not only in soft drinks and fruit juices, but in canned goods (notably soups), leading to increased intake of fluoride by individuals in communities with nonfluoridated water.” – Fomon SJ, Ekstrand J, Ziegler EE. (2000). Fluoride intake and prevalence of dental fluorosis: trends in fluoride intake with special attention to infants. Journal of Public Health Dentistry 60(3):131-9.

“Because the main component of most beverages is water, the fluoride content of these products closely parallels the fluoride content of water used in their processing.” – Levy SM, Guha-Chowdhury N. (1999). Total fluoride intake and implications for dietary fluoride supplementation. Journal of Public Health Dentistry 59: 211-23.

“We cannot… ignore water fluoridation as a major source of ingested fluoride.” – Heller KE, et al (1997). Dental Caries and Dental Fluorosis at Varying Water Fluoride Concentrations. Journal of Public Health Dentistry 57: 136-143.

There is an intense amount of controversy surrounding fluoridation since the 1990’s.The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has set a standard of 4.0 ppm as the maximum allowable fluoride level in drinking water. Within the United States, fluoride levels in drinking water are actually maintained at about one-fourth of this level. However, in some developing countries, particularly in southern Asia and northern Africa, natural fluoride is present at extremely high levels. In India, for example, a study sponsored by the World Health Organization found natural fluoride levels exceeding 1.5 ppm in about 8 percent of samples, with some concentrations as high as 22.0 ppm. In such areas, public health workers actively engage in efforts to reduce fluoride exposure and eliminate fluorosis.

How do I remove arsenic, lead and fluoride from my drinking water?

The most effective way to economically reduce chlorine taste and odor in water is through the use of granular activated carbon (GAC). The unique properties of carbon that are most beneficial in water treatment are its extremely high surface area and its electro-positive charge. One pound of carbon contains the surface area of 125 acres and can absorb literally thousands of different chemicals. Acting like little magnets, GAC attract poor taste and odor producing compounds resulting in great tasting, healthier water throughout the home. GAC has been certified to remove or reduce many volatile organic chemicals such as chlorine, benzene, trihalomethanes, radon, solvents and hundreds of other chemicals found in water.

Specialty Filter Pricing …………………………………………………………………………$53.81

Chloramines

Chloramines include compounds containing chlorine and nitrogen; esp., an unstable, colorless, pungent liquid, NHCl, used to make hydrazine. As a class of amines, chloramines are produced when ammonia and chlorine (as hypochlorous acid) react with each other.

How is it used?

Chloramine is increasingly used in water treatment plants rather than chlorine, as it has been/still is ( controversy surrounding this ) believed that chloramine is much more stable and will not dissipate from water, ensuring disinfection until it reaches the consumers. In chloramine water treatment, monochloramine (NH2Cl) is formed by adding chlorine and ammonia under controlled conditions.

Chloramine is used principally in systems requiring a reduction in tastes and odors, or a reduction in disinfection byproducts, such as trihalomethanes (THMs). Particularly where the water supply contains phenol, free chlorine readily reacts to form chlorophenol, which has a very disagreeable taste and odor. More recently, many public water systems have found that chloramine can be used to reduce the THM level in their water. The primary disadvantage of chloramine is that it is a much weaker and slower acting disinfectant than free chlorine. It is particularly weak for inactivating certain viruses. In water systems that use chloramine as the principal disinfectant, ammonia is added at a point downstream from the initial chlorine application so that microorganisms, including viruses, will be exposed to the free chlorine for a short period before the chloramine is formed.

What are the health effects?

Hospitals and kidney dialysis centers must be alerted when chloramines are used for water supply disinfection. Cases of chloramine-induced hemolytic anemia in patients have been reported when their dialysis water was not appropriately treated. Persons with liver or kidney disease and those with hereditary urea cycle disorders are at increased risk for ammonia toxicity from the consumption of chloraminated water and kidney dialysis patients cannot use chloraminated water in their dialysis machines because it will cause hemolytic anemia.

Respiratory irritations as chloramine fumes can cause an individual to become congested and cause sneezing, sinus congestion, coughing, choking, wheezing, shortness of breath, and asthma.

Chloraminated vapor from showers, baths, hot tubs, dishwashers, and other household appliances contains volatilized chemicals that can be inhaled and cause irritation to the respiratory tract. Chloramine exposure also damages lung mucosa, making the lungs more susceptible to allergens and infections

Chloramine tap water can cause severe skin reactions: rashes, itching, welting, chapping, cracking, bleeding, dry skin, flaking, blistering, burning sensation, scarring, pigmentation. Chloramine can also aggravate other skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis.

Is there any harm from drinking and bathing in contaminated water?

Unlike chlorine, chloramines do not rapidly dissipate on standing. Neither do they dissipate by boiling.
Drawbacks to the use of chloramine can include potential water quality problems (e.g., nitrification and corrosion) if the treatment process is not carefully controlled and the system’s operational practices are not appropriately adjusted for the new disinfectant. Chloramine can change the chemical properties of the water, which can impact corrosion of lead and copper.

In order to meet standards set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), municipal water districts across the United States are changing they way they disinfect public water supplies. In many cases this involves adding ammonia to chlorinated water to produce chloramines, or
chloraminated water.

While chloramination has been recommended by the EPA since the 1990s as a way to lower the level of carcinogenic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) created by chlorination, it has led to unintended consequences, in some cases making the water extremely toxic. Chloramines, like chlorine, are toxic to fish and amphibians at levels used for drinking water.

How do I remove chloramine(s) from my drinking water?

The most effective way to economically reduce chlorine taste and odor in water is through the use of granular activated carbon (GAC). The unique properties of carbon that are most beneficial in water treatment are its extremely high surface area and its electro-positive charge. One pound of carbon contains the surface area of 125 acres and can absorb literally thousands of different chemicals. Acting like little magnets, GAC attract poor taste and odor producing compounds resulting in great tasting, healthier water throughout the home. GAC has been certified to remove or reduce many volatile organic chemicals such as chlorine, benzene, trihalomethanes, radon, solvents and hundreds of other chemicals found in water.

Specialty Filter Pricing …………………………………………………………………………$46.40

Heavy Metals

The term heavy metal refers to any metallic chemical element that has a relatively high density and is toxic or poisonous at low concentrations. They are elements having atomic weights between 63.546 and 200.590, and a specific gravity greater than 4.

Heavy metals are natural components of the Earth’s crust. They cannot be degraded or destroyed. To a small extent they enter our bodies via food, drinking water and air. As trace elements, some heavy metals are essential to maintain the metabolism of the human body. However, at higher concentrations they can lead to poisoning. Heavy metal poisoning could result, for instance, from drinking-water contamination (e.g. lead pipes), high ambient air concentrations near emission sources, or intake via the food chain.

All heavy metals exist in surface waters in colloidal, particulate, and dissolved phases, although dissolved concentrations are generally low . The colloidal and particulate metal may be found in 1) hydroxides, oxides, silicates, or sulfides; or 2) adsorbed to clay, silica, or organic matter. The soluble forms are generally ions or unionized organo-metallic chelates or complexes. The solubility of trace metals in surface waters is predominately controlled by the water pH, the type and concentration of ligands on which the metal could adsorb, and the oxidation state of the mineral components and the redox environment of the system.

Living organisms require trace amounts of some heavy metals, including cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, vanadium, strontium, and zinc. Excessive levels of essential metals, however, can be detrimental to the organism. Non-essential heavy metals of particular concern to surface water systems are cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, arsenic, and antimony.

How are they used?

The three most pollutants heavy metals are Lead, Cadmium, and Mercury. Some examples are listed below. Additional heavy metals include but are not limited to; antimony, cobalt, iron, manganese, molybdenum, tin, vanadium, etc.

Antimony – is a metal used in the compound antimony trioxide, a flame retardant. It can also be found in batteries, pigments, and ceramics and glass.

Cadmium – derives its toxicological properties from its chemical similarity to zinc an essential micronutrient for plants, animals and humans. Uses of cadmium are as pigments, stabilisers for PVC, in alloys, electronic compounds, phosphate fertilisers, detergents and refined petroleum products. Acute exposure to cadmium generally occurs in the workplace, particularly in the manufacturing processes of batteries and color pigments used in paint and plastics, as well as in electroplating and galvanizing processes.

Chromium – is used in metal alloys and pigments for paints, cement, paper, rubber, and other materials.

Copper – is normally in drinking water from copper pipes, as well as from additives designed to control algal growth.

Mercury – the natural source of mercury is the degassing of the Earth’s crust, emissions from volcanoes and evaporation from natural bodies of water. World-wide mining of the metal leads to indirect discharges into the atmosphere. The usage of mercury is widespread in industrial processes and in various products (e.g. batteries, lamps and thermometers). It is also widely used in dentistry as an amalgam for fillings and by the pharmaceutical industry.

Nickel – The EPA does not currently regulate nickel levels in drinking water. Nickel can accumulate in aquatic life, but its presence is not magnified along food chains.

Selenium – Plant foods are the major dietary sources of selenium in most countries throughout the world. Selenium also can be found in some meats and seafood. Animals that eat grains or plants that were grown in selenium-rich soil have higher levels of selenium in their muscle.

What are the health effects?

In very small amounts, many of these metals are necessary to support life. However, in larger amounts, they become toxic. They may build up in biological systems and become a significant health hazard.

Exposure to toxic heavy metals is generally classified as acute, 14 days or less; intermediate, 15-354 days; and chronic, more than 365 days. Chronic toxicity results from repeated or continuous exposure, leading to an accumulation of the toxic substance in the body. Chronic exposure may result from contaminated food, air, water, or dust; living near a hazardous waste site; spending time in areas with deteriorating lead paint; maternal transfer in the womb; or from participating in hobbies that use lead paint or solder.

Is there any harm from drinking and bathing in contaminated water?

There are unique health aliments for each of the heavy metals including birth defects, central nervous system breakdowns, renal system disruptions, irritations, cancers, organ failures, arthritis, autism, weight loss, nausea, mood swings, hypertension, headaches, diseases, insomnia, fatigue, etc. The are many serious results of being poisoned by heavy metals.

How do I remove heavy metals from my drinking water?

The most effective way to economically reduce chlorine taste and odor in water is through the use of granular activated carbon (GAC). The unique properties of carbon that are most beneficial in water treatment are its extremely high surface area and its electro-positive charge. One pound of carbon contains the surface area of 125 acres and can absorb literally thousands of different chemicals. Acting like little magnets, GAC attract poor taste and odor producing compounds resulting in great tasting, healthier water throughout the home. GAC has been certified to remove or reduce many volatile organic chemicals such as chlorine, benzene, trihalomethanes, radon, solvents and hundreds of other chemicals found in water.

Specialty Filter Pricing …………………………………………………………………………$63.60

Hydrogen Sulfide

As a chemical compound, H2S, a colorless gas that has a very disagreeable odor, much like that of rotten eggs. It is slightly soluble in water and is soluble in carbon disulfide. Dissolved in water, it forms a very weak dibasic acid that is sometimes called hydrosulfuric acid. Hydrogen sulfide is flammable; in an excess of air it burns to form sulfur dioxide and water, but if not enough oxygen is present – it forms elemental sulfur and water. Hydrogen sulfide is found naturally in volcanic gases and in some mineral waters. It is often formed during decay of animal matter. It is a part of many unrefined carbonaceous fuels, e.g., natural gas, crude oil, and coal; it is obtained as a byproduct of refining such fuels. It may be made by reacting hydrogen gas with molten sulfur or with sulfur vapors, or by treating a metal sulfide (e.g., ferrous sulfide, FeS) with an acid. Hydrogen sulfide reacts with most metal ions to form sulfides; the sulfides of some metals are insoluble in water and have characteristic colors that help to identify the metal during chemical analysis.

How is it used?

Natural gas contains up to several percent H2S(g) and as such are called sour gas wells from their offensive stench. Volcanoes also discharge hydrogen sulfide. Anaerobic decay aided by bacteria produces hydrogen sulfide, which in turn, produces sulfur. This process accounts for much of the native sulfur found in nature. Commercially hydrogen sulfide is obtained from “sour gas” natural gas wells. Hydrogen sulfide has few important commercial uses. However, it is used to produce sulfur which is one of the most commercially important elements. Exposure in a residential setting can come from nearby industrial and agricultural sources, oil and gas development, and wastewater treatment plants, all generally regulated sources. However, exposure to hydrogen sulfide from contaminated drinking water is an exposure route often not covered by regulation, especially rural drinking water supplies from groundwater. Hydrogen sulfide gas also occurs naturally in some groundwater. It is formed from decomposing underground deposits of organic matter such as decaying plant material. It is found in deep or shallow wells and also can enter surface water through springs, although it quickly escapes to the atmosphere. Hydrogen sulfide often is present in wells drilled in shale or sandstone, or near coal or peat deposits.

What are the health effects?

Immediate symptoms may include dizziness, upset stomach, loss of consciousness and/or death.

Is there any harm from drinking and bathing in contaminated water?

Although many impurities are regulated by Primary or Secondary Drinking Water Standards set by the EPA, hydrogen sulfide is not regulated. A concentration high enough to be a drinking water health hazard also makes the water unpalatable.

The odor of water with as little as 0.5 ppm of hydrogen sulfide concentration is detectable by most people. Concentrations less than 1 ppm give the water a “musty” or “swampy” odor. A 1-2 ppm hydrogen sulfide concentration gives water a “rotten egg” odor and makes the water very corrosive to plumbing.

How do I remove hydrogen sulfide from my drinking water?

The most effective way to economically reduce chlorine taste and odor in water is through the use of granular activated carbon (GAC). The unique properties of carbon that are most beneficial in water treatment are its extremely high surface area and its electro-positive charge. One pound of carbon contains the surface area of 125 acres and can absorb literally thousands of different chemicals. Acting like little magnets, GAC attract poor taste and odor producing compounds resulting in great tasting, healthier water throughout the home. GAC has been certified to remove or reduce many volatile organic chemicals such as chlorine, benzene, trihalomethanes, radon, solvents and hundreds of other chemicals found in water.

Specialty Filter Pricing …………………………………………………………………………$81.20

Nitrates

In most cases of excess nitrate concentrations in aquatic systems, the primary source is surface runoff from agricultural or landscaped areas which have received excess nitrate fertilizer. These levels of nitrate can also lead to algae blooms, and when nutrients become limiting (such as potassium, phosphate or nitrate) then eutrophication can occur. As well as leading to water anoxia, these blooms may cause other changes to ecosystem function, favoring some groups of organisms over others. Consequently, as nitrates form a component of total dissolved solids, they are widely used as an indicator of water quality.

Nitrates are also a by-product of septic systems. Specifically, they are a naturally occurring chemical that is left after the break down or decomposition of animal or human waste. Water quality may also be affected through ground water resources that have a high number of septic systems in a watershed. Nitrate in groundwater originates primarily from fertilizers, septic systems, and manure storage or spreading operations. Fertilizer nitrogen that is not taken up by plants, volatilized, or carried away by surface runoff leaches to the groundwater in the form of nitrate. This not only makes the nitrogen unavailable to crops, but also can elevate the concentration in groundwater above the levels acceptable for drinking water quality. Nitrogen from manure similarly can be lost from fields, barnyards, or storage locations. Septic systems also can elevate groundwater nitrate concentrations because they remove only half of the nitrogen in wastewater, leaving the remaining half to percolate to groundwater.

How is it used?

Nitrates are used mostly for agriculture. Nitrates such as potassium nitrate (saltpeter) and ammonium nitrate are an important source of nitrogen in fertilizers. These nitrates must be used quickly by plants because they are easily lost through leaching or densification by bacteria. Nitrate pollution has become an environmental issue in rivers and oceans.

What are the health effects?

Methemoglobinemia is the most significant health problem associated with nitrate in drinking water. Blood contains an iron-based compound called hemoglobin, which carries oxygen. When nitrate is present, hemoglobin can be converted to methemoglobin, which cannot carry oxygen. In the blood of adults, enzymes continually convert methemoglobin back to hemoglobin, and methemoglobin levels normally do not exceed 1 percent. Newborn infants have lower levels of these enzymes, and their methemoglobin level is usually 1 to 2 percent. Anything above that level is considered methemoglobinemia.

Is there any harm from drinking and bathing in contaminated water?

Congress passed the federal Safe Drinking Water Act in 1974. The U S. Environmental Protection Agency was given responsibility for setting drinking water standards for all the states, and each state became responsible for enforcing these standards.

Because potential health risks are often unknown or hard to predict, many drinking water standards are set at some fraction of the level of “no-observed adverse-health effects.” In general, the greater the uncertainty about potential health effects, the greater the margin of safety built into the standard.

If your private or public water supply has elevated nitrate levels, then purchasing bottled water is one of your best alternatives. Even in bottled water, nitrate levels can vary considerably. Some states require bottled water companies to have their water tested for nitrate annually. As long as the results are below the state standard, the companies don’t have to report the actual levels to the Department of Health, but they should be willing to give exact test results to consumers.

Municipal water supplies are another potential source of low nitrate water. City water supplies often come from large lakes or reservoirs where any source of nitrate is likely to be diluted by the large quantity of water.

Hauling your own water from springs, lakes, or streams can be risky, both because of the unknown levels of nitrate and because of the possible presence of other contaminants, especially bacteria. Private wells also present the risk of unknown nitrate levels, but are more likely to have been tested for bacterial contamination.

How do I remove nitrate from my drinking water?

The most effective way to economically reduce chlorine taste and odor in water is through the use of granular activated carbon (GAC). The unique properties of carbon that are most beneficial in water treatment are its extremely high surface area and its electro-positive charge. One pound of carbon contains the surface area of 125 acres and can absorb literally thousands of different chemicals. Acting like little magnets, GAC attract poor taste and odor producing compounds resulting in great tasting, healthier water throughout the home. GAC has been certified to remove or reduce many volatile organic chemicals such as chlorine, benzene, trihalomethanes, radon, solvents and hundreds of other chemicals found in water.

Specialty Filter Pricing …………………………………………………………………………$72.21

Sediment

Minerals, including iron or manganese (Fe/Mn) are present in many types of water. The other common mineral, that possibly could cause sediment in water, is hardness. Hardness precipitate, by itself, would have a white/yellow color. Fe/Mn precipitates typically are loose sediments that are too small to be felt between the fingers. Hardness precipitates typically “plate out” as a solid. Sometimes this solid may break off and can be captured as irregular sized pieces.

How is it used?

Sediments are particles from the bedrock, generally caught between casings, from new constructions, rain, or from runoff. The granules cloud the water and are nuisance more than anything, altering the color of your water from a “clear” to cloudy and sometimes brownish-greyish, whitish, or various other “tints.”

What are the health effects?

Studies have linked sediment ingestion over long periods of time to various cancers depending on the type, level, amount of ingestion as well as consideration of gender, age, and demographic of the individuals affected.

Is there any harm from drinking and bathing in contaminated water?

Since there is a large variety of sediments, there are various harms and contamination levels. Systems with wells are the most susceptible but rainwater or stormwater will greatly affect any water source – even those that are filtered before residential delivery. Direct contact to skin may contain a nominal effect, however ingestion can lead to illness, contamination, and if over an extended amount of time, serious health conditions.

How do I remove sediment from my drinking water?

Easy, a .5 micron carbon filter will reduce the sediment. These water filters produce healthier, better-tasting drinking water with around a 99.5% reduction of Cryptosporidium, Giardia, Entamoeba, etc. Additionally there is premium high capacity bad taste & odor and chlorine taste & odor reduction

Specialty Filter Pricing …………………………………………………………………………$7.76

Green Carbon

In terms of base material, Coconut shell is renewable resources compared to Lignite and Bituminous. Coconut plantations with millions of acres of land continue to provide all the benefits of green trees to our environment in spite of using billions of coconut shell per year for activation.

Many natural substances are used as base material to make activated carbon. The most common of these used in water purification are lignite, bituminous, peat and coconut shell. Different base materials and the activation process results in unique pore size and pore distribution. The pore size grouping in carbon are commonly described by its pore diameter:Macro pores (above 50 nm diameter), Meso pores (2-50 nm diameter) and Micro pores (under 2nm diameter).

Coconut Shell based activated carbon is predominately micro porous and is well suited for organic chemical adsorption. Coconut shell based carbon are least dusty and has the most hardness compared to other type of activated carbons which makes it the ideal carbon for water purification

In the pit method of charring coconut shells, the GHGs are emitted to the atmosphere with out any control and treatment of effluent gases. Global Ecocarb Pvt Ltd has developed a novel process to char the coconut shells in a reactor capturing the GHGs and using them under controlled conditions for the production of thermal energy. Since char is generated during the gasification process the entire operation is self-sustaining.

In this novel process the shells are fed from the top with twin air entry, re-burn process. This process consists of a fuel and ash handling system, gasification system – reactor, gas cooling and cleaning system. The process is unique to prevent the formation of tar during pyrolysis.

How is it used?

Activated carbon is produced from coconut shells by a two-step process. The first step in activation is to carbonize the shells to drive out about two thirds of the volatiles out of the shells creating carbonaceous mass full of tiny pores. This carbonized base material in the second stage is activated at high temperature (1100 degree C) in steam.

The carbonization process involves converting the coconut shells to Char (charcoal). The charring process (making of charcoal) is known as the Pyrolysis, which is chemical decomposition of the shell by heating in the absence of oxygen. During the carbonization of coconut shells, volatiles amounting to 70% of the mass of coconut shells on dry weight basis are released to the atmosphere, yielding 30% of coconut shell mass of charcoal. The volatile released during the carbonization process is Methane, CO2 and wide range of organic vapors. Coconut shells are carbonized in an old-age process commonly known as open pit method. In this process earth is used as an insulator and to heat the shells in the absence of oxygen.

One ton of coconut shells releases about 12 to 15 Kg of Methane into the atmosphere. India, Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Indonesia are the primary countries that char coconut shells for activation to be used in water and air purification. Several countries in the ASEAN region in the recent years have also started charring coconut shells for activation process.

What are the health effects?

All positive as there is an attempt to increase awareness of environmental impact of using coconut shell activated carbon that is charred by the pit method. Determined to be a change agent in lowering the GHGs emission, this carbon source is changing traditional methodologies and geared toward preserving our environment.

Is there any harm from drinking and bathing in green carbon water?

Nope. This carbon removes unwanted sediments, minerals, and particles in an eco-friendly way.

Specialty Filter Pricing …………………………………………………………………………$45.00

IONLIFE’S WHOLE HOME CHLORINE REDUCTION SYSTEM

What is chlorine?

Chlorine is a naturally occurring element that can be found on land and in the sea. Typically, chlorine is in a gaseous form (heavier than air) but when processed at the correct pressure & temperature it can be formed into a liquid. You are generally not in danger of exposure to chlorine form natural sources.

How is it used?

Some of the common uses of chlorine include:

Manufacturing: Suppliers of paper and cloth products use it as a bleaching agent.

Chemical weapons: Chlorine gas, also known as bertholite, was first used as a weapon in World War I by Germany on April 22, 1915, in the Second Battle of Ypres. More recently, chlorine gas has also been used by insurgents in the Iraq War to terrorize the local population and coalition forces. On March 17, 2007, for example, three chlorine filled trucks were detonated in the Anbar province killing 2 and sickening over 350.

Cleaning products: Many commonly used cleaners use chlorine as a disinfecting/bleaching ingredient

Swimming pools: Due to the very powerful oxidizing properties of the chlorine, it is very effective at disinfecting large bodies of water.

Drinking water: Water borne diseases can be eliminated with the appropriate dosage of chlorine. Virtually every municipality in the U.S. uses chlorine in drinking water supplies.

What are the health effects?

Depending upon the strength of chlorine and length of exposure it is corrosive and irritating to soft tissues, especially eyes, skin and respiratory tract. Exposure to low amounts may cause a sore throat, eye and skin irritation and coughing. In high volumes, can cause narrowing of bronchi, blue coloring of the skin and even death.

Common exposure to chlorine occurs in swimming pools, drinking water and showers. In some cases, people can be allergic to chlorine and cannot drink tap water or bathe in traditional tap water. In this case, additional treatment is needed prior to drinking and additives are used to neutralize chlorine while bathing/showering.

Is there any harm from drinking and bathing in chlorinated water?

“Cancer risk among people drinking chlorinated water is 93% higher than among those whose water does not contain chlorine.”
US COUNCIL OF ENVIROMENTAL QUALITY

“Chlorine is the greatest crippler and killer of modern times. While it prevented epidemics of one disease, it was creating another. Two decades ago, after the start of chlorinating our drinking water in 1904, the present epidemic of heart trouble, cancer and senility began.”
SAGINAW HOSPITAL – DR J.M. PRICE

“The drinking of chlorinated water has finally been officially linked to an increased incidence of colon cancer. An epidemiologist at Oak Ridge Associated Universities completed a study of colon cancer victims and non-cancer patients and concluded that the drinking of chlorinated water for 15 years or more was conducive to a high rate of colon cancer.” Health Freedom News, January/February 1987

“Scientists discovered that chlorine reacted with organic material in water to produce hundreds of chemical by-products, several of which have proved in animal studies to be carcinogenic.”
U.S. NEWS AND WORLD REPORT – JULY 29, 1991

“Drinking chlorinated water may as much as double the risk of bladder cancer.”
NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE – KENNETH CANTOR

“Long-term drinking of chlorinated water appears to increase a person’s risk of developing bladder cancer as much as 80%,” according to a study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Some 45,000 Americans are diagnosed every year with bladder cancer. St. Paul Dispatch & Pioneer Press, December 17, 1987

“Although concentrations of these carcinogens are low…it is precisely these low levels which cancer scientists believe are responsible for the majority of human cancers in the United States.” Report Issued By The Environmental Defense Fund

Greenpeace reports have found chlorine-based compounds to be the most common toxic and persistent pollutants in the Great Lakes

“Drinking tap water that is chlorinated is hazardous if not deadly to your health.”
HEALTHY WATER FOR LONGER LIFE – DR. MARTIN FOX

“The cause of atherosclerosis and resulting heart attacks and strokes is none other than the ubiquitous chlorine in our drinking water.”
CORONARIES/CHOLESTEROL/CHLORINE – DR. J.M. PRICE

How do I remove chlorine taste and odors in drinking water?

The most effective way to economically reduce chlorine taste and odor in water is through the use of granular activated carbon (GAC). The unique properties of carbon that are most beneficial in water treatment are its extremely high surface area and its electro-positive charge. One pound of carbon contains the surface area of 125 acres and can absorb literally thousands of different chemicals. Acting like little magnets, GAC attract poor taste and odor producing compounds resulting in great tasting, healthier water throughout the home. GAC has been certified to remove or reduce many volatile organic chemicals such as chlorine, benzene, trihalomethanes, radon, solvents and hundreds of other man-made chemicals found in tap water.

How does IonLife’s whole home system work?

IonLife offers the highest quality product on the market today for whole home taste and odor reduction. The system includes the most sophisticated controls including a metered valve head monitors the volume of water passing through the system and automatically backwashes as needed. The backwashing process removes any accumulated suspended materials such as sand, dirt and rust. The backwashing system needs no maintenance except for replacement of the carbon approximately every 5-7 years. Backwashing requires access to a drain and electricity. In circumstances where a drain and electricity is not available a non-backwashing system is available. The non-backwashing system needs replacement of the GAC media every 3 years, which is a simple process that can be done by most customers without the need for professional assistance.

What makes IonLife’s system different?

Control Valve: The metered control valve optimizes the backwashing system and does it only when needed. Other systems use the less expensive timered valve head that regenerates on a schedule regardless of the amount of water used. The timered valves will invariably backwash too often or not often enough.

The use of KDF Process Media results in the total elimination of some contaminants and a great reduction of a wide variety of others.Rust-proof construction of tanks with stainless steel exterior: Ion Life’s high quality fiberglass tank prevents the creation of rust in drinking water caused by the tank. Our attractive stainless steel exterior shell looks great in any location. Other models on the market offer metallic tanks or fiberglass tanks without the stainless steel exterior.

Heavy metal reduction: Ion Life’s system also includes the industry standard for heavy metal reduction, KDF. Used for decades in the industry, KDF also provides enhanced chlorine reduction and bacteriostatic benefits. KDF Fluid Treatment’s unique combination of copper and zinc (Redox) creating an electro-chemical reaction. During this reaction, electrons are transferred between molecules, and new elements are created. Some harmful contaminants are changed into harmless components. Some heavy metals such as copper, lead, mercury and others, react to the medium’s surface, thus being effectively removed from the water supply. The Redox reaction also helps to control bacteria growth.

How much will it cost me for the IonLife system?

BACKWASHING SYSTEMS

Chlorine Reduction System (4.5 GPM & 7 GPM peak flow) $1,699

Metered Control Valve

10” X 54” Tank with Stainless Steel Jacket

KDF Media Guard

Bypass Valve

Installation Not Included

High Capacity Chlorine Reduction System (6 GPM & 16 peak flow) $1,799

Metered Valve

12” X 56” Tank with Stainless Steel Jacket

Bypass Valve

Installation Not Included

KDF NOT AVAILABLE IN HIGH FLOW SYSTEMS

NON-BACKWASHING SYSTEMS

Chlorine Reduction System (4.5 GPM & 7 GPM peak flow) $1,399

10” X 54” Tank with Stainless Steel Jacket

KDF Media Guard

Bypass Valve

Installation Not Included

High Capacity Chlorine Reduction System (6 GPM & 16 peak flow) $1,499

12” X 56” Tank with Stainless Steel Jacket

Bypass Valve

Installation Not Included

KDF NOT AVAILABLE IN HIGH FLOW SYSTEMS

Advertisements

Responses

  1. […] Read the original: NEW FILTERS!!!!! IonLife has Specialty Water Ionizer Filters for their Jupiter Ionizers! Description… […]


Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: